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Data from: A few meters matter: local habitats drive reproductive cycles in a tropical lizard

Citation

Otero, Luisa Matilde; Huey, Raymond B.; Gorman, George C. (2015), Data from: A few meters matter: local habitats drive reproductive cycles in a tropical lizard, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.669r8

Abstract

Reproductive phenology often varies geographically within species, driven by environmental gradients that alter growth and reproduction. However, environments can differ between adjacent habitats at single localities. In lowland Puerto Rico, both open (sunny, warm) and forested (shady, cool) habitats may be only meters apart. The lizard Anolis cristatellus lives in both habitats: it thermoregulates carefully in the open but is a thermoconformer in the forest. To determine whether reproduction differs between habitats, we compared reproductive cycles of females in open versus forest habitats at two localities for over 2 years. Open females were more likely than forest females to be reproductive throughout the year, probably because open females were able to bask and thereby achieve warmer body temperatures. These between-habitat differences in reproduction were especially marked in cool months and are equivalent in magnitude to those between populations separated by elevation. Thus, environmental differences (even on a microlandscape scale) matter to reproduction and probably to demography.

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